Each Insulation Project is Unique

Even experts can make final decisions and specifications only after they have carefully studied a project, including the occupants and their habits; the contents and function of the structure; the objectives sought; the combustion devices and other vapor-formers inside the building; proper ventilation; temperatures and humidities desired; type and details of building structure and equipment needed; and then only on the understanding that they must also supervise construction, installation and actual initial operation after occupancy.

The physician who diagnoses an illness or the attorney who considers a legal problem, may refer to books for stimulation, general information and relevant case histories; but he must carefully study the particular patient or problems, reach his own conclusions, make his own decisions. No book can do this for him. Nor are the cases of any two patients or clients exactly alike.

The consulting engineer or architect, when called upon to "prescribe" for a particular structure, can not refer to a book alone for the answer. Nevertheless this booklet should be immensely helpful even to a "non-expert" for it can supply him with much valuable information. The expert too, will find very useful data, which will refresh his knowledge of the physics and mechanics involved, even though some of it may be controversial.

Each project is unique, a law unto itself. Circumstances and conditions are never identical. Each building is so different from every other building, even an adjoining one which seems to be identical; that in addition to the fact we do not encroach on the function of the architectural and engineering specialists who study, design and supervise a project and its operation, it would be impossible for any booklet to do so.

The insulation requirements of almost any two or more residences or cold storage houses for instance, will differ greatly from each other as well as from obviously different types of structures, such as farm buildings, schools, hospitals, etc. What may be suitable for one structure is often not applicable to the very same type structure next door. Too many variables may be present and must be considered.

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